Tomcat 7.0

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  1. Tomcat 7.0.57
  2. Tomcat 7.0.88

Tomcat configuration should not be the only line of defense. The other components in the system (operating system, network, database, etc.) should also be secured.

Tomcat 7.0.88Tomcat 7.0.34

Apache Tomcat is an open source implementation of the Java Servlet and JavaServer Pages technologies. Overview: Like many server applications, Tomcat installs a variety of class loaders (that is, classes that implement java.lang.ClassLoader) to allow different portions of the container, and the web applications running on the container, to have access to different repositories of available classes and resources.This mechanism is used to provide the functionality defined in the Servlet. Apache Tomcat is a open source web server for Java application of Apache Foundation like Apache HTTP server. It used for deploying Java Servlet and JSP applications. To deploy an application in Tomcat we can simply create a war file and deploy them. Prepare the Certificate Keystore: Tomcat currently operates only on JKS, PKCS11 or PKCS12 format keystores. The JKS format is Java's standard 'Java KeyStore' format, and is the format created by the keytool command-line utility. This tool is included in the JDK. The PKCS12 format is an internet standard, and can be manipulated via (among other things) OpenSSL and Microsoft's Key-Manager.

Tomcat should not be run under the root user. Create a dedicated user for the Tomcat process and provide that user with the minimum necessary permissions for the operating system. For example, it should not be possible to log on remotely using the Tomcat user.

File permissions should also be suitably restricted. Taking the Tomcat instances at the ASF as an example (where auto-deployment is disabled and web applications are deployed as exploded directories), the standard configuration is to have all Tomcat files owned by root with group Tomcat and whilst owner has read/write privileges, group only has read and world has no permissions. The exceptions are the logs, temp and work directory that are owned by the Tomcat user rather than root. This means that even if an attacker compromises the Tomcat process, they can't change the Tomcat configuration, deploy new web applications or modify existing web applications. The Tomcat process runs with a umask of 007 to maintain these permissions.

At the network level, consider using a firewall to limit both incoming and outgoing connections to only those connections you expect to be present.

Like many server applications, Tomcat installs a variety of class loaders (that is, classes that implement java.lang.ClassLoader) to allow different portions of the container, and the web applications running on the container, to have access to different repositories of available classes and resources. This mechanism is used to provide the functionality defined in the Servlet Specification, version 2.4 — in particular, Sections 9.4 and 9.6.

Tomcat 7.0.57

Tomcat 7.0.26 failing to start jsvc. How to display date and time in tomcat catalina.out log file. Tomcat logging to multiple files. Why my Tomcat 7 stop.

Tomcat 7.0.88

In a Java environment, class loaders are arranged in a parent-child tree. Normally, when a class loader is asked to load a particular class or resource, it delegates the request to a parent class loader first, and then looks in its own repositories only if the parent class loader(s) cannot find the requested class or resource. Note, that the model for web application class loaders differs slightly from this, as discussed below, but the main principles are the same.

7.0.54

When Tomcat is started, it creates a set of class loaders that are organized into the following parent-child relationships, where the parent class loader is above the child class loader:

7.0.88

The characteristics of each of these class loaders, including the source of classes and resources that they make visible, are discussed in detail in the following section.