Gpx File Reader

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What is GPXSee?

GPX viewer allows the user to quickly view a GPX file without installing software on your computer or smartphone. What is a GPX file? GPX, or GPS Exchange Format, is an XML schema designed as a common GPS data format for software applications. The is an open format which can be used freely. GPX files are commonly used in GPS tracker like Garmin, Mio Cylo, Teasi One, Teasi Pro. Conversion from GPX to PDF. Upload your GPX data (widely used in software like OziExplorer, Google Earth and GPS devices) and convert them by one click to PDF (GeoPDF) format (widely used in software like Adobe Reader). Bug fix Version 1.1.0. 0 - Bug fix Features 1). Gpx files viewer 2) Gps navigation 3) Track your route on map 4) Follow me on map 5) Replay a route previously stored 6) Save the route in your. The file format specifications are available by Microsoft for public download and can be referred to from developer’s perspective. RTF file format has underwent several revisions since its publication. Its official version for read/write was published as part of Microsoft Word 3.0 for Macintosh with version 1.0 specifications. Load GPX: Ctrl+O: Import and visualize GPX files (or drag and drop anywhere in the window) Draw: Ctrl+D: Start drawing a new route by placing track points on the map: Export: Ctrl+S: Download the files to your desktop or save to Google Drive™ to get a shareable link and embedding code. Time, heart rate, cadence and temperature data are automatically extended.

GPXSee is a GPS log file viewer and analyzer that supports all common GPS log file formats.

Key features

  • Opens GPX, TCX, FIT, KML, NMEA, IGC, CUP, SIGMA SLF, Suunto SML, LOC, GeoJSON, OziExplorer (PLT, RTE, WPT), Garmin GPI & CSV and geotagged JPEG files.
  • User-definable online maps (OpenStreetMap/Google tiles, WMTS, WMS, TMS, QuadTiles).
  • Offline maps (OziExplorer maps, TrekBuddy maps/atlases, Garmin IMG/GMAP & JNX maps, TwoNav RMaps, GeoTIFF images, MBTiles, BSB charts, KMZ maps, AlpineQuest maps, Locus/OsmAnd/RMaps SQLite maps, Mapsforge maps).
  • Elevation, speed, heart rate, cadence, power, temperature and gear ratio/shifts graphs.
  • Support for DEM files (SRTM HGT).
  • Support for POI files.
  • Print and export to PNG and PDF.
  • Multiple tracks in one view.
  • Full-screen mode.
  • HiDPI/Retina displays and maps support.
  • Native GUI (Qt) for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux.
  • Free software (GPLv3 open-source license).

GPXSee is designed as a small (no dependencies except of Qt), fast and uncomplicated GPS data/map viewer, not a full featured GIS software. However, the spectrum of supported data files/map sources is relatively rich, see the Documentation section for details.

Getting GPXSee

Additionally to the source codes, GPXSee is available as a Windows installer and an OS X dmg from the project's Sourceforge page and in form of various Linux packages from the project's openSUSE Build Service page. Most Linux distributions (Archlinux, Fedora, Gentoo, openSUSE, ...) as well as BSD distributions (FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD) also provide GPXSee in their official repositories, however not always in the latest version.

On OS X you can also use the MacPorts or Homebrew packaging systems to install GPXSee.

The official Windows & OS X installers are always signed using certificates available at the GitHub project page. As the certificates are non-commercial (self-signed) you have to import the certificate on Windows first if you want your OS automatically check the installer when installing GPXSee. On OS X, Apple does not allow software that does not generate them profit like GPXSee to pass OS X's Gatekeeper (you can't import custom certificates) so you need to run the application using the 'right click menu' when opening it for the first time.

Online maps

GPXSee supports most tile server based online maps out there, but the list of map definitions distributed with the official packages is limited to a small set of well known global map services. You may however easily extend (or change) the default map list with your own map definitions.

There is a community driven GPXSee maps repository on GitHub where you can find a lot of additional map definitions for various map services, usually run by some state geographic institution or a non-profit organization.

Reporting bugs

If you have found a bug in GPXSee, please report it using the GitHub issue tracker. Bugs that are not reported can not be fixed! If you are missing some feature in GPXSee, you may also use the tracker to request it.

Bad/missing translations can be fixed directly on the projects Weblate page.

What is a RTF file?

Introduced and documented by Microsoft, the Rich Text Format (RTF) represents a method of encoding formatted text and graphics for use within applications. The format facilitates cross-platform document exchange with other Microsoft Products, thus serving the purpose of interoperability. This capability makes it a standard of data transfer between word processing software and, hence, contents can be transferred from one operating system to another without losing document formatting. The file format specifications are available by Microsoft for public download and can be referred to from developer’s perspective.

Brief History

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RTF file format has underwent several revisions since its publication. Its official version for read/write was published as part of Microsoft Word 3.0 for Macintosh with version 1.0 specifications. The final version of specifications, 1.9.1 was published by Microsoft in Mar 2008. No more enhancements to the specifications are made after this. At present, almost all operating systems have more feature rich applications that have minimized/eradicated the use of RTF file format.

File Format Specifications

RTF serves as a standard of data transfer between word processing software and transfer of content from one operating system to another. This is achieved using control words that were introduced by Microsoft Office Word up through 2007. A standard RTF file consists of ASCII to represent rich text and with non-ASCII characters that is converted to appropriate code values. Newer versions of Word can read RTF files generated with previous versions, while the older versions ignore control words and groups they don’t understand.

Understanding the Foundations

RTF files use 7-bit ASCII plain text, consisting of:

  • control words
  • control symbols, and
  • groups.

These act as the building blocks for representation of RTF data as understandable text and character encoding.

Control Word

These represent specially formatted command used to mark characters for display and can not be longer than 32 letters. A control word is defined by:

<ASCII Letter Sequence>//<//Delimiter//>//

Each control word is case sensitive and starts with a backslash. The ASCII Letter Sequence can contain ASCII Alphabets (a through z and A through Z). The marks the end of the control word’s name and can be one of the following:

  • A space. This serves only to delimit a control word and is ignored in subsequent processing.
  • A numeric digit or an ASCII minus sign , which indicates that a numeric parameter is associated with the control word. The subsequent digital sequence is then delimited by any character other than an ASCII digit (commonly another control word that begins with a backslash). The parameter can be a positive or negative decimal number. The range of the values for the number is nominally –32768 through 32767, i.e., a signed 16-bit integer. A small number of control words take values in the range‌ −2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 (32-bit signed integer). These control words include binN, revdttmN//, rsidN related control words and some picture properties like bliptagN. Here N stands for the numeric parameter. An RTF parser must allow for up to 10 digits optionally preceded by a minus sign. If the delimiter is a space, it is discarded, that is, it’s not included in subsequent processing.
  • Any character other than a letter or a digit. In this case, the delimiting character terminates the control word and is not part of the control word. Such as a backslash “”, which means a new control word or a control symbol follows.

Control Symbol

A Control Symbol represents a special occurrence that has specific meaning depending upon its contents. It consists of a backslash followed by a special character (non-alphabetical character) and don’t have any delimiters.

Group

A group can consist of text, control words, or control symbols enclosed in braces ({ }). The opening brace ({ ) indicates the start of the group and the closing brace ( }) indicates the end of the group. Each group specifies the text affected by the group and the different attributes of that text.

RTF File Structure

An RTF file has the following Standard syntax:

Introduced and documented by Microsoft, the Rich Text Format (RTF) represents a method of encoding formatted text and graphics for use within applications. The format facilitates cross-platform document exchange with other Microsoft Products, thus serving the purpose of interoperability. This capability makes it a standard of data transfer between word processing software and, hence, contents can be transferred from one operating system to another without losing document formatting. The file format specifications are available by Microsoft for public download and can be referred to from developer’s perspective.

Brief History

RTF file format has underwent several revisions since its publication. Its official version for read/write was published as part of Microsoft Word 3.0 for Macintosh with version 1.0 specifications. The final version of specifications, 1.9.1 was published by Microsoft in Mar 2008. No more enhancements to the specifications are made after this. At present, almost all operating systems have more feature rich applications that have minimized/eradicated the use of RTF file format.

File Format Specifications

RTF serves as a standard of data transfer between word processing software and transfer of content from one operating system to another. This is achieved using control words that were introduced by Microsoft Office Word up through 2007. A standard RTF file consists of ASCII to represent rich text and with non-ASCII characters that is converted to appropriate code values. Newer versions of Word can read RTF files generated with previous versions, while the older versions ignore control words and groups they don’t understand.

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Understanding the Foundations

RTF files use 7-bit ASCII plain text, consisting of:

  • control words
  • control symbols, and
  • groups.

These act as the building blocks for representation of RTF data as understandable text and character encoding.

Control Word

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These represent specially formatted command used to mark characters for display and can not be longer than 32 letters. A control word is defined by:

<ASCII Letter Sequence>//<//Delimiter//>//

Each control word is case sensitive and starts with a backslash. The ASCII Letter Sequence can contain ASCII Alphabets (a through z and A through Z). The marks the end of the control word’s name and can be one of the following:

  • A space. This serves only to delimit a control word and is ignored in subsequent processing.
  • A numeric digit or an ASCII minus sign (-), which indicates that a numeric parameter is associated with the control word. The subsequent digital sequence is then delimited by any character other than an ASCII digit (commonly another control word that begins with a backslash). The parameter can be a positive or negative decimal number. The range of the values for the number is nominally –32768 through 32767, i.e., a signed 16-bit integer. A small number of control words take values in the range‌ −2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 (32-bit signed integer). These control words include binN//, revdttmN, rsidN related control words and some picture properties like bliptagN. Here N stands for the numeric parameter. An RTF parser must allow for up to 10 digits optionally preceded by a minus sign. If the delimiter is a space, it is discarded, that is, it’s not included in subsequent processing.
  • Any character other than a letter or a digit. In this case, the delimiting character terminates the control word and is not part of the control word. Such as a backslash “”, which means a new control word or a control symbol follows.

Control Symbol

A Control Symbol represents a special occurrence that has specific meaning depending upon its contents. It consists of a backslash followed by a special character (non-alphabetical character) and don’t have any delimiters.

Group

A group can consist of text, control words, or control symbols enclosed in braces ({ }). The opening brace ({ ) indicates the start of the group and the closing brace ( }) indicates the end of the group. Each group specifies the text affected by the group and the different attributes of that text.

RTF File Structure

An RTF file has the following Standard syntax:

FieldDescription
<File>{<header><document>}

By standard, we mean that any RTF reader must be able to correctly read the RTF written to this syntax, provided that they should be able to ignore the unknown or unused control words. This also implies that the RTF readers should be robust enough to handle some variations that are generated by RTF writers without conforming to this syntax.

RTF Header

An RTF Header has the following representation.

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FieldDescription
<header>rtf1fbidis? <character set> <from>? <deffont> <deflang> <fonttbl>? <filetbl>? <colortbl>? <stylesheet>? <stylerestrictions>? <listtables>? <revtbl>? <rsidtable>? <mathprops>? <generator>?

Header tables must appear in this order if they exist. The RTF file can include groups for fonts, styles, screen color, pictures, footnotes, comments (annotations), headers and footers, summary information, fields, bookmarks, document-, section-, paragraph- and character-formatting properties, mathematics, images, and objects. If the font, file, style, color, revision mark, and summary-information groups and document-formatting properties are included in the file, they must appear in the RTF header, which precedes the RTF body. If the content of any group is not used, the group can be omitted. Any group that uses the properties defined in another group must appear after the group that defines those properties. For example, colour and font properties must precede the style group.

RTF Version

An RTF document must start out with these six characters:

where the 1 shows the RTF version number.

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Character Set

After the {rtf1, the document should declare what character set it uses. The way to declare a character set is with one of these commands:

ansi - The document is in the ANSI character set, also known as Code Page 1252, the usual MSWindows character set.

mac - The document is in the MacAscii character set, the usual character set under old (pre-10) versions of Mac OS.

pc - The document is in DOS Code Page 437, the default character set for MS-DOS. Typists with good muscle-memory will note that this is the character set that is still used for interpreting “Alt numeric” codes—i.e., when you hold down Alt and type “130” on the numeric keypad, it produces a é, because character 130 in CP437 is an é. That is about the only use that CP437 sees these days.

pca - The document is in DOS Code Page 850, also known as the MS-DOS Multilingual Code Page.

Font Command

The Character set definition is followed by the deffN command. This defines that the font number N is the default font for this document. The font number N is referred from the font table. The command deffN is technically optional, but it should be there to be on the safe side as a common prolog like following picks font 0 as the default font.

{rtf1ansideff0

Font Table

All the fonts that can be used in a document are listed in a font table where each font is represented by a font number. Document must have a font table though some programs will work without that as well.

The syntax for a font table is {fonttbl //…declarations//…}, in which each declaration has this basic syntax:

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{fnumberfamilycommand Fontname;}

A font table with four declarations is as follow:

In a document with that font table, {f2 stuff} would print “stuff” in Courier New. A font can’t be used in a document until it is listed in the font table.

End of Document

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Every RTF document must end with a }, to close the group opened by the { that is the first character in the document. Nothing can follow the final }, except possibly a newline.

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References