Gns3 Cloud

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GNS3 allows you to run a small topology consisting of only a few devices on your laptop, to those that have many devices hosted on multiple servers or even hosted in the cloud. GNS3 is open source, free software that you can download from It is actively developed and supported and has a growing community of over 800,000 members. I have configured this lab in GNS3 with router IOS “c3660-telcoentk9-mz.124-13b.bin”, you can use any other router with MPLS support. 1) Basic Interfaces Configuration and IP Addresses Following are the IP setting but notice that the interfaces that connect to the CE routers do not have this setting, since the traffic to the PE is pure IP.

So, in connecting my virtual gns3 network to my local, physical lan, I found the connection speeds to be abysmal. Host to host speeds within the virtual network were good but communicating from a virtual host to a physical host had speeds around 10kbps.

On Windows 10, open the Run window and type hdwwiz and click OK. The hdwwiz command is a.

Some poking around on Google revealed that this is a common problem. I was able to solve this by following the advice in this article.

To create a new GNS3 topology, select a group of devices in the Devices Toolbar by clicking the Browse Routers button The routers available will depend on your GNS3 configuration. In this example both a local router and GNS3 VM router are available. Drag and drop a local router to the GNS3 Workspace. GNS3 supports both emulated and simulated devices. Emulation: GNS3 mimics or emulates the hardware of a device and you run actual images on the virtual device. For example, you could copy the Cisco IOS from a real, physical Cisco router and run that on a virtual, emulated Cisco router in GNS3.

My use case is quite simplified from the article in that I do not need tap interfaces, and on Ubuntu 18.04, netplan does not support tap interfaces anyway. If you need a more exotic configuration (bonded interfaces with VLANs, and tap-like interfaces), I found this information to be quite useful.

Here is my netplan configuration file:

Gns3 On Azure

Now, when I drop a cloud object into my gns3 project, instead of linking to the physical interface enp14s0, I connect to the bridging interface br0.

Gns3 cloud configuration

Now my throughput to my physical LAN is in the megabit range with none of the connectivity issues that I saw before.

So, in connecting my virtual gns3 network to my local, physical lan, I found the connection speeds to be abysmal. Host to host speeds within the virtual network were good but communicating from a virtual host to a physical host had speeds around 10kbps.

Cloud

Some poking around on Google revealed that this is a common problem. I was able to solve this by following the advice in this article.

Gns3

My use case is quite simplified from the article in that I do not need tap interfaces, and on Ubuntu 18.04, netplan does not support tap interfaces anyway. If you need a more exotic configuration (bonded interfaces with VLANs, and tap-like interfaces), I found this information to be quite useful.

Here is my netplan configuration file:

Now, when I drop a cloud object into my gns3 project, instead of linking to the physical interface enp14s0, I connect to the bridging interface br0.

Gns3 Cloud Node

Now my throughput to my physical LAN is in the megabit range with none of the connectivity issues that I saw before.